Right side finished

Right side finished

RHS before

This is the kind of thing that a new loom can eliminate.

Iain’s Triumph 250

Quite a rare bike: an oil-in-frame 250 single from the end of days at old Triumph. Owner Iain wanted a new loom with a few mod cons: a Paul Goff regulator rectifier, Pazon ignition and LED bulbs for the indicators and tail light.

The existing loom was quite good, but replacing it was a chance to make internal earths rather than the old Brit custom of having them all on show. I could also simplify the routing and cosmetics, which Iain was keen on. The LEDs mean that the original warning lamp flows enough current to light both sets of indicators. You solve this problem by plumbing in a neat device Goffy calls a tweaker. It’s little more than a Y-shaped bit of wire, but it works.

Years ago people preserved the the old Lucas aluminium switchgear clusters by packing them with axle grease. This sounds like a good idea, but it isn’t. The grease embrittles the wire insulation, and anyway water still gets in to cause corrosion anyway. Cleaning the grease out is a major pain too. I lubricated the rebuilt switchgear with Carlube silicone grease. It’s brilliant stuff. I use it all the time to lube insulators and protect crimps.

The front brake cable had one of those old in-line switches. I don’t think they are a great idea because they stress the electrical wires as the bars turn left and right. Eventually there will be a live wire flapping around looking to cause trouble.

Iain kept the tank because it needed sorting out. We had a long chat about where to put cables so that it would still fit. I started the motor to test the charging system using a remote tank and a carb borrowed from my old Enfield. The TR25’s oil leaks were quite impressive, but fortunately I didn’t have to sort them out.

This is what trail bikes looked like in 1971

This is what trail bikes looked like in 1971